Mercury

What it is

Mercury is the only liquid metal. It is also a transition metal. Mercury has long been known as quicksilver, because it is a silver liquid. The chemical symbol also reflects this property. The symbol, Hg, comes from the Latin term hydrargyrum, meaning “watery silver”.

Mercury has been around for thousands of years. In many cultures, people learned to make Mercury metal from its most important ore, cinnabar. Cinnabar usually occurs as a dark red powder. When heated, cinnabar releases mercury as a vapor (gas). The vapor is cooled and captured as liquid Mercury.

In the last fifty years, chemists have learned a great deal more about the toxic effects of both Mercury metal and most of its compounds. They now know that Mercury itself enters the body very easily. Its vapors pass through the skin into the blood stream. Its vapors can also be inhaled. And, of course, it can also be swallowed. In any of these cases, Mercury gets into the blood and then into cells. There it interferes with essential chemical reactions and can cause illness and death.

Mercury

What it does

Mercury has no known biological role but is present in every living thing and widespread in the environment. Every mouthful of food we eat contains a little Mercury.

Our daily intake is less than 10 micrograms (about 0.3 grams in a lifetime), and this we can cope with easily. However, in much higher doses it is toxic and one form of Mercury – Methylmercury – is particularly dangerous. It can accumulate in the flesh of fish and be eaten by people, making them ill.

Mercury has been scientifically proven to have damaging effects on your kidneys, nervous system, cardiovascular system and immune system. In fact, it’s SO toxic that entire buildings have been evacuated for a Mercury spill smaller than a standard dental filling.

And before a dentist can remove one of those fillings from your teeth, he must don the equivalent of a HAZMAT suit! Yet, in spite of all these known risks, you’re somehow supposed to believe that Mercury is safe in your mouth, or in your child’s mouth, for many decades.

Neurological and behavioural disorders may be observed after inhalation, ingestion or dermal exposure of different Mercury compounds. Symptoms include tremors, insomnia, memory loss, neuromuscular effects, headaches and cognitive and motor dysfunction. Mild, subclinical signs of central nervous system toxicity can be seen in workers exposed to an elemental Mercury level in the air of 20 μg/m3 or more for several years. Kidney effects have been reported, ranging from increased protein in the urine to kidney failure.

Mainstream medicine, including the AMA and the CDC have denounced virtually all studies with regard to vaccines and the negative side effects including autism.

Mercury

Why it’s used

  1. Anti fungal and bacteriostatic properties.Thimerosal is a crystalline organic mercurial antiseptic C9H9HgNaOZS used especially for its anti fungal and bacteriostatic properties: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Thimerosal. Invented in the 1920’s by Ep lilly, Thimerosal is 49.6% Ethyl Mercury by weight, a neurotoxin known to be more than 100 times more lethal to tissue than lead.
  2. As a preservativeMercury is used in some pharmaceuticals, such as thiomersal (ethyl Mercury), which is used as a preservative in some vaccines.
  3. Conductor of electricityThis property is used in a number of practical devices. One such device is a Mercury switch, such as the kind that turns lights on and off. A small amount of Mercury can be placed into a tiny glass capsule. The capsule can be made to tip back and forth. As it tips, the Mercury flows from one end to the other. At one end of the capsule, the Mercury may allow an electric current to flow through a circuit. At the other end, no Mercury is present, so no current can flow. Mercury switches are easy to make and very efficient.


Mercury

What it is

Mercury is the only liquid metal. It is also a transition metal. Mercury has long been known as quicksilver, because it is a silver liquid. The chemical symbol also reflects this property. The symbol, Hg, comes from the Latin term hydrargyrum, meaning “watery silver”.

Mercury has been around for thousands of years. In many cultures, people learned to make Mercury metal from its most important ore, cinnabar. Cinnabar usually occurs as a dark red powder. When heated, cinnabar releases mercury as a vapor (gas). The vapor is cooled and captured as liquid Mercury.

n the last fifty years, chemists have learned a great deal more about the toxic effects of both Mercury metal and most of its compounds. They now know that Mercury itself enters the body very easily. Its vapors pass through the skin into the blood stream. Its vapors can also be inhaled. And, of course, it can also be swallowed. In any of these cases, Mercury gets into the blood and then into cells. There it interferes with essential chemical reactions and can cause illness and death.

Mercury

What it does

Mercury has no known biological role but is present in every living thing and widespread in the environment. Every mouthful of food we eat contains a little Mercury.

Our daily intake is less than 10 micrograms (about 0.3 grams in a lifetime), and this we can cope with easily. However, in much higher doses it is toxic and one form of Mercury – Methylmercury – is particularly dangerous. It can accumulate in the flesh of fish and be eaten by people, making them ill.

Mercury has been scientifically proven to have damaging effects on your kidneys, nervous system, cardiovascular system and immune system. In fact, it’s SO toxic that entire buildings have been evacuated for a Mercury spill smaller than a standard dental filling.

And before a dentist can remove one of those fillings from your teeth, he must don the equivalent of a HAZMAT suit! Yet, in spite of all these known risks, you’re somehow supposed to believe that Mercury is safe in your mouth, or in your child’s mouth, for many decades.

Neurological and behavioural disorders may be observed after inhalation, ingestion or dermal exposure of different Mercury compounds. Symptoms include tremors, insomnia, memory loss, neuromuscular effects, headaches and cognitive and motor dysfunction. Mild, subclinical signs of central nervous system toxicity can be seen in workers exposed to an elemental Mercury level in the air of 20 μg/m3 or more for several years. Kidney effects have been reported, ranging from increased protein in the urine to kidney failure.

Mainstream medicine, including the AMA and the CDC have denounced virtually all studies with regard to vaccines and the negative side effects including autism.

Mercury

Why it’s used

  1. Anti fungal and bacteriostatic properties.Thimerosal is a crystalline organic mercurial antiseptic C9H9HgNaOZS used especially for its anti fungal and bacteriostatic properties: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Thimerosal. Invented in the 1920’s by Ep lilly, Thimerosal is 49.6% Ethyl Mercury by weight, a neurotoxin known to be more than 100 times more lethal to tissue than lead.
  2. As a preservativeMercury is used in some pharmaceuticals, such as thiomersal (ethyl Mercury), which is used as a preservative in some vaccines.
  3. Conductor of electricityThis property is used in a number of practical devices. One such device is a Mercury switch, such as the kind that turns lights on and off. A small amount of Mercury can be placed into a tiny glass capsule. The capsule can be made to tip back and forth. As it tips, the Mercury flows from one end to the other. At one end of the capsule, the Mercury may allow an electric current to flow through a circuit. At the other end, no Mercury is present, so no current can flow. Mercury switches are easy to make and very efficient.

Sources of mercury

Then there are very surprising sources of Mercury contamination that most would not suspect nor know. All persons are exposed to heavy metals in our daily lives in many ways, including through polluted air, contaminated water, and through chemicals in food.

Mercury is contained in many products, including: batteries, measuring devices, such as thermometers and barometers, electric switches and relays in equipment, skin-lightening products and other cosmetics (thiomersal is widely used to make mascara) plus even :

Pharmaceuticals

Pharmaceuticals icon

Mercury compounds are in some over-the-counter drugs, including topical antiseptics, stimulant laxatives, diaper rash ointment, eye drops, and nasal sprays. Mercury is still used in some diuretics, although other things can be used for most therapeutic uses like vaccines such as for Hepatitis, DTP, Flu, Anliphapte japonaise (25 mcg/0,5 ml = 0,025 mg).

Dental Amalgams

Dental icon

Mercury dental fillings, or amalgams, have been used for more than I50 years, despite the fact that Mercury is one of the most potent neurotoxins known to man.

Dental amalgam is an antiquated filling material that’s typically an alloy of 50 percent Mercury and 50 percent other metals (copper, tin, silver and zinc). Mercury fillings are deceptively called “silver fillings,” referring to the colour of the material rather than its composition.

Mercury Bulb CFL’s (Compact Fluorescent Lights)

Bulb icon

One application in which concerns about mercury have had little impact is fluorescent lamps. A fluorescent lamp contains Mercury vapor (gas). When the lamp is turned on, some electric current passes through the Mercury vapor, causing it to give off invisible radiation. The radiation strikes the inside of the glass tube, whose walls are coated with a phosphor. A phosphor is a material that gives off visible light when struck by electrons. The tube glows as the radiation strikes the phosphor.

Compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) have about 4,000 mcg of Mercury in them. Most of the Mercury inside is bound to the bulb during use and cannot escape. Be careful when installing or replacing a CFL, as it could break. All CFLs should be recycled and not be thrown in the garbage. You can return these bulbs to the place where you bought them. If you break a bulb and Mercury escapes, call your hazardous waste person or local fire department for directions on decontaminating the spill area.

Coal Burning Plants

Coal Burning Plants icon

Mercury from coal burning power plants is both a global and local issue. Although a portion of the emissions reaches high in the atmosphere and gets distributed far and wide, it also contaminates locally.

Combustion of fossil fuels is one of the greatest sources of Mercury vapor emissions. Coal plants pump this Mercury vapor into the air, which we inhale unknowingly, while corporations dump Mercury-filled waste into our rivers, streams and oceans from which we drink water and consume fish. (Elizabeth Weise. 2009. Federal Study Shows Mercury Found in All Fish Caught in U.S.-Tested Streams).

Environmental

Environmental icon

Alkap and metal processing, incineration of coal, and medical and other waste, plus mining of gold and Mercury contribute greatly to Mercury concentrations in some areas, but atmospheric deposition is the dominant source of Mercury over most of the landscape. Once in the atmosphere, Mercury is widely disseminated and can circulate for years, accounting for its wide-spread distribution. Natural sources of atmospheric Mercury include volcanoes, geological deposits of Mercury, and volatization from the ocean. Although all rocks, sediments, water, and soils naturally contain small but varying amounts of Mercury, scientists have found some local mineral occurrences and thermal springs that are naturally high in Mercury.

Eating Fish

Fish icon

The effects depend on your weight, and the amount of Mercury in the fish. For instance, according to the FDA standards, if you weigh 130 pounds, you should eat no more than 4 ounces of fish typically medium high in Mercury (tuna, halibut, grouper, northern pike, bass) per week. If you weigh 170 pounds, then you can eat as much as 5.3 ounces a week. Keep in mind, this is presuming you don’t eat any other seafood during the week. For the higher Mercury fish such as swordfish, tilefish, king mackerel, and shark, you should not eat these at all if you are planning a pregnancy, are pregnant, nursing, or are a young child/infant. For the rest of the population, these fish should not be consumed more than once per month.

An article published on August 19, 2009, in USA Today showed that research conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey found every fish caught in a U.S. stream tested positive for Mercury and 27 percent of the fish caught had Mercury levels high enough to exceed what the EPA considered safe to consume. (Dr. Rashid A. Buttar, ” The 9 Steps to Keep the Doctor Away, Simple Actions to shift Your Body and Mind to Optimum Health for Greater Longevity “, 2010, p. 262).

Quotes of experts

“The neurological effects of mercury are very well understood, and as a result, suspicions have swirled for years around the connection between autism and mercury in early childhood vaccinations. Interestingly, the CDC’s 2003 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) study showed that a significant number of women of child bearing are in the USA are mercury toxic. Later, a study conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and published in Environmental Health Perspetives reviewed the NHANES data from 1999 to 2004 and found that approximately one out of six women of child bearing age in the USA is mercury toxic.”

Kathryn R. Mahaffey, Robert P. Clickner, and Rebecca A. Jeffries

“Despite being extremely dangerous, mercury is found literally everywhere. Industries mix mercury with other substances to create more toxic compounds, from the inorganic to an organic form such as ethyl mercury or methyl mercury. When altered like this, mercury becomes more easily assimilated into the body and thus becomes an even worse poison than the naturally occurring elemental mercury.”

Rashid A. Buttar. M.D.

“Meanwhile, a study published in the Journal of Pediatrics disclosed that 17 percent (approximately one in six) of U.S. children were reported to have some type of neurological compromise, whether it was ADHD, autism, seizure disorder, cerebral palsy or some other neurological disability.”

C.A. Boyle, P. Decoufle, M. Yeargin-Alisopp

“LD1 of mercury would kill 1 mouse in 100 samples. LD1 of lead would kill 1 mouse out of 100. If you give those 100 mice LD1 of mercury, enough to kill one of them, and LD1 of lead, synergistically it kills 100 mice out of 100.”

Charlie Brown, J.D.

“We are exposed to 15,000 chemicals daily, but only 500 have ever been checked for health issues.”

Robert A. Nash M.D.